In Greek mythology, Antigone is the daughter/sister of  Oedipus and his mother,  Jocasta. Antigone is the subject of a story in which she attempts to secure a respectable burial for her brother Polynices. King Creon, who has ascended to the throne of Thebes after the death of the brothers, decrees that Polynices is not to be buried or even mourned, on pain of death by stoning. Antigone, Polynices' sister, defies the order, but is caught. Sophocles' Antigone ends in disaster, with Antigone being locked in a tomb on Creon's orders. 
Ismene:
 
Antigone, what is it?
I can feel something horrible, something frightening in your words.
 
Antigone:
 
The burial of our brothers, Ismene!
Chorus:

Antigone, Danae’s body, too, had to endure the exchange of our
sky’s sunlight with a bronze dungeon and she accepted the
burden of her Fate to live hidden in a grave-like chamber. 
Chorus:

What calamity have you brought to the kings this time?
 
Herald:

They’re dead!  Both of them because of those still living!
Chorus:

Yes, but I see Creon’s wife, poor, unfortunate Eurydice! 
I wonder if she has come out of her room because
she has heard of her son’s death or just by accident.
Creon:

For all this – for all this disaster,
there’s no one else to blame except me.
Maquette d'étude
échelle 1/50

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